Alexey Jawlensky

1864 - 1941

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Went to abstraction same time as Kandinsky: 1909. Girl in grey apron shows his knowledge of the fauves.2

1864

Born March 13 in Torzhok. 

1882

From 82 attended a military academy in Moscow.

1884

Started to paint. Is a lieutenant.

1889

Moved to St. Petersburg: military duties and attended an academy of art. In a circle with Ilya Repin, the most distinguished painter of the day.

1891

Met Marianne Werefkin, girlfriend.

1896

Resigns and moves to Munich with Werefkin.

Studying in Anton Azbi’s Studio until 99.

1897

Meets Kandinsky.

1903

Goes to Normandy and Paris. Influenced by Van Gogh.

1905

Goes to Brittany. Assimilating the practice and aesthetic of the Pont-Avon School. Meets Matisse. Exhibited at the Salon d’Automne, 10 paintings.

1906

Met Verkade in Munich.

1907

In Paris to work in Matisse’s studio.

1908

Summer in Murnau with Kandinsky, Munter and Werefkin.

1909

Cofounds Die Neue Kunstleruereinigung, The New Artists Alliance. The programme: “the use of the artistic forms to express the interpenetration of impressions of the external world and experiences of the inner world” His portraits move towards simplification. Concentrates on the head, eyes. Form becomes increasingly monumental, ideaographic.

1911

To Paris again: meets Matisse again? Van Dongen? His style is fully developed. Summer at Prerow on Baltic Coast.

1912

Meets Klee and Nolde. Breakup of Die Neue Kunstleruereinigung.

1913

Verkade stopped on his way to Vienna in Munich and visited for the second time.

1914

Goes to Switzerland, Saint-Prex on Lake Geneva. Puts an end to his sensuous painting. Expression turns to contemplation. Paints his soul. From 1914-1918 he does a series of small Variations on a Landscape Theme

1915

Turns to human face but moves away from individual. (likened to S-R’s style) Towards simple geometric structure, devotional; away from realism.

1921

Moves to Wiesbaden.

1941

Dies March 15.

 

SOURCES

1.  The Expressionists. Wolf-Dieter Dube, trans by Mary Whittall. Thames and Hudson, 1972.
2.  The Royal Academy of Art. Derain to Kandinsky: Masters of Colour, 2000.